Ancient Murugan Temple on Hills in Palani, Tamilnadu, India

Ancient Murugan Temple on Hills in Palani, Tamilnadu, India

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Ancient Murugan Temple on Hills in Palani, Tamilnadu, India. Priests of these ancient Temples accept and agree that the ancestors of DevendraKulathar are the ancient Tamil Kings namely Chera, Chola, Pandiya.There are ownership documents (Pattayam signed during 1500s) that show that the Palani Murugan Temple and numerous ancient Temples belong to people of Devendrakulam.

Ancient Murugan Temple on Hills in Palani, Tamilnadu, India

The Temple is situated upon the higher of the two hills of Palani, known as the Sivagiri. Traditionally, access to it was by the main staircase cut into the hill-side or by the yanai-padhai or elephant’s path, used by the ceremonial elephants. Pilgrims bearing water for the ritual bathing of the idol, and the priests, would use another way also carved into the hill-side but on the opposite side. Over the past half-century, three funicular railway tracks have been laid up the hill for the convenience of the pilgrims, and supplemented by a rope-way within the past decade.

The sanctum of the temple is of early Chera architecture while the covered ambulatory that runs around it bears unmistakable traces of Pandya influence, especially in the form of the two fishes, the Pandyan royal insignia. The walls of the sanctum bear extensive inscriptions in the old Tamil script. Surmounting the sanctum, is a gopuram of gold, with numerous sculptures of the presiding deity, Kartikeya, and gods and goddesses attendant upon him.

In the first inner prahāram, or ambulatory, around the heart of the temple, are two minor shrines, one each, to Shiva and Parvati, besides one to the Sage Bhogar who is by legend credited with the creation and consecration of the chief idol. In the second outer prahāram, is a celebrated shrine to Ganapati, besides the carriage-house of the Lord’s Golden Chariot.

Mythology

Sage Narada once visited the celestial court of Lord Shiva at Mount Kailash to present to Him a fruit, the gyana-pazham (literally, the fruit of knowledge), that held in it the elixir of wisdom.

Upon Lord Shiva expressing his intention of dividing the fruit between his two sons, Ganesha and Karthikeya, the Sage counseled Him against cutting it. He decided to award it to whichever of his two sons first circled the world thrice. Accepting the challenge, the Lord Karthikeya started his journey around the globe on his sacred bird, the peacock.

However, Lord Ganesha, who surmised that the world was no more than his parents Shiva and Shakti, circumambulated them. Pleased with their son’s discernment, Lord Shiva awarded the fruit to Lord Ganesha. When the Lord Subrahmanya returned, he was furious to learn that his efforts had been in vain. In deep dudgeon, he decided to leave Mount Kailash and take up his abode in a place where the land and people would be unequivocally his and for him. Thus, it was that He came to what is today known as Pazhani(Palani), a name derived from the manner of His Parents trying to mollify him and prevail upon him to return to Kailash — Gnana Pazham Nee appa (Tamil for “You are the fruit of wisdom sire”), implying that, being the embodiment of wisdom, he had no need for the fruit. Thus, being the abode of wisdom, the place took on its master’s name: Pazham Nee or Pazhani, anglicised as Palani.

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